Wednesday, June 2, 2021

@TheIWSG #IWSG #WritingCommunity #WritersSupportGroup




Join Alex J. Cavanaugh and a multitude of writer's in this monthly hop to help support one another!

Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds! 

The first Wednesday of every month is officially Insecure Writer’s Support Group day. Post your thoughts on your own blog. Talk about your doubts and the fears you have conquered. Discuss your struggles and triumphs. Offer a word of encouragement for others who are struggling. Visit others in the group and connect with your fellow writer - aim for a dozen new people each time - and return comments. This group is all about connecting!

Let’s rock the neurotic writing world!

Our Twitter handle is @TheIWSG and hashtag is #IWSG 

June 2 question - For how long do you shelve your first draft, before reading it and re-drafting? Is this dependent on your writing experience and the number of stories/books under your belt?
 
It is a good idea to put your first draft on the back burner and let it simmer. The purpose is to allow your head clear, and/or begin on something new. 

I've heard some authors say that they wait a month or more, but I have a hard time writing a new project with the old one rambling around in my head. I rarely wait a long time. It could be days to a week before I begin the second draft.
 
I don't know if this happens with all authors, but I can be laying in bed, walking, gardening, or whatever, and a certain word or paragraph pops into my head concerning my WIP. Like ~ Fix-it! 

When I began writing, I can't even count how many drafts it took to make it presentable. But lately, I rewrite 3 drafts. However, I find myself editing whenever my characters refuse to speak with me...LOL....Then I'm done. I let it stew, waiting for those words or paragraphs to pop into my head to be revised before I send it to an editor. 

   



31 comments:

  1. I definitely know the "fix it now" urge. There's an entire folder of just .txt notes to myself to edit, written while I was away from the computer.

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  2. I'm generating a list of fixes I know I need to make when I get to the revising stage of my manuscript. I don't think I could wait longer than a month to get going on revisions either.

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  3. My bouncy brain always has a few stories on the go, so leaving one story for a next isn't too difficult :)

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  4. Love the meme at the end - so true. I try to leave things longer but lately the revisions have been happening much sooner after the first draft. Perhaps that’s as time goes on. Your impressive book list shows you’re well advanced in writing and editing - maybe I’ll get to that stage one day! :)

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  5. Stories just come and usually when you least expect them to.

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  6. I generally prefer to write one project at a time to completion, but I don't have trouble letting it sit between drafts while I start another. The big consideration for me is whether I'm working on a deadline. No deadline + no pressure = slooooow progress.

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  7. Yep, the writing stuff popping in happens to me all the time. I call it think-writing. There's a scene in a movie I once saw where a character was on deadline, but stuck on a project. In the emotional climax of the movie, he says "You won't stop me from writing. Heck, I'm writing right now." That line resonated with me!

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  8. There have been times I've finished a first draft and the next day jumped back into editing. Other times I've let a first draft sit for who knows how long.

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  9. I think it's a safe indication when your characters stop talking to you that one should stop for a bit. Makes sense to regroup, right? For me, the time I let a manuscript sit is different; it depends on lots of things - including life interrupting. LOL

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  10. The less I re-read and do mini-edits, the more objectivity I have when it comes time to do the final polish.

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  11. I'm the same. Can be in the shower or brushing my teeth, doing laundry or right when I'm about to fall asleep and something will pop in my head.

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  12. I’m like you — I don’t wait too long, I’m too impatient to get it done!
    And I love all my edit phases to make it less of a chore and help me spot areas for improvement =)

    Tara Tyler Talks

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  13. I seem to be in a constant state of fix it. :)

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    1. I used to be, and at times, I still am. There has to come a time you have to say enough is enough. But it's hard to do...

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  14. That's the perfect meme for editing lol.

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  15. I get so annoyed when they wait to speak up until the first draft is done and the changes they suggest take a total rewrite.

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  16. Sounds like you have a solid process that works for you.
    Happy Writing!

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