Wednesday, October 2, 2019

#IWSG @TheIWSG #writer #writerslife #writingcommunity





Join Alex J. Cavanaugh and a multitude of writer's in this monthly hop to help support one another!

Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all 


Alex's awesome co-hosts are Ronel Janse van Vuuren, Mary Aalgaard, Madeline Mora-Summonte, and Ellen @ The Cynical Sailor!


October 2 question - It's been said that the benefits of becoming a writer who does not read is that all your ideas are new and original. Everything you do is an extension of yourself, instead of a mixture of you and another author. On the other hand, how can you expect other people to want your writing, if you don't enjoy reading? What are your thoughts?



This question rattled my brain because I hadn't thought there could be such a writer ~ A writer who does not read seems unreal. Reading expands my concepts of storytelling. I didn't receive a college degree in creative writing, grammar, sentence structure, and whatnot. My leaning came from extensive reading. (Which is an everlasting learning experience) There are rules to creative writing and some writer's break the rules which can be fun. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. I never thought of myself as being an extension of another writer. Although, readers like to compare writers to other writers and sometimes that's an honor.

On the other spectrum, a writer who hasn't read another person's story could create something original. However, don't we all strive for originality? There are millions and millions of books that are original, though they touch on a similar topics. I doubt all these novels are from writer's who don't read.

If you are a writer who doesn't like to read I'd like to hear from you.   








40 comments:

  1. A writer who doesn't read DOES seem unreal! How would we know we liked to write stories if we hadn't fallen in love with reading them first?

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  2. Very unreal. How did they learn to write without reading?

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  3. As most writers don't have a degree in creative writing, reading books for us is like doing a crash course in writing. We definitely learn from other writers and we learn a lot by reading their book/books..

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  4. Great message. I like that C.S. Lewis quote. It gives me courage to write the story that's in my mind.
    Happy IWSG Day!
    Mary at Play off the Page

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  5. I'm like you in having no education in creative. I learn so much from reading. Plus it is just a big part of who I am.

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  6. It seemed unreal to me too LOL. I bet lots of us had the same reaction to the question.
    I don't have any writing education either but I've been reading since I was old enough to do so and listened to stories read by my parents long before that.

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  7. I love the C.S. Lewis quote! Not reading seems pretty unreal to me, too.

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  8. Great quotes. I remember when it was a "thing" to cut a portion of your writing into an app and have it spit out which well-known author you wrote like. Then you could post the badge...

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  9. I agree: reading the work of authors who do my genre well is the most important part of my writerly education. Happy writing in October!

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  10. Love that CS Lewis quote!! Haven't heard that one before.
    I can't imagine trying to write a novel without being a reader

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  11. Replies
    1. I think most writer's are in agreement about this question.

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  12. Being too original can be a detriment to your book. Book experts say that genre readers want your book to be just like the others, only different. Sounds silly, but readers expect a certain experience from the books they buy, and a writer won't know what that experience should if they don't read books.

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  13. I believe that not reading will make you less original.
    I love the CS Lewis quote.

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  14. Hi!
    Yes, it's hard to understand a writer that won't read. It's hard for me to think about people that don't read at all. It's weird!
    Great post.
    BTW- your blogger profile doesn't lead to your blog. There isn't any profile info or links. Just a heads up.
    Thank you!
    Heather

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    1. Thanks Heather, been having problems with my blog.

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  15. I can't imagine not having books and stories in my life. Great quotes.

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  16. The first quote says it all!
    I love reading. Always have, always will.
    I can't understand people who don't read. Do they know what they're missing? I guess not.

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  17. Love the CS Lewis quote. Such a smart guy.

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  18. Love all the quotes, esp. the one from Melville. Trying and failing is so much better than never trying.

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  19. I enjoyed your post and especially your quotes. They are inspiring!
    I had a creative writing class and in that class I wrote a short story which everyone had said was NOT original though, at the time, I didn't like to read. So, if we read, we know what we can avoid. If we don't, how can we know? Same note: I wrote a book in which a friend pointed out was very much like Twilight. What?! I was displeased because I'd never read or seen the movie. Interesting, isn't it?

    Thank you for dropping by my blog. :)

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  20. Excellent point--reading is a writer's education! Without it, how would we know how to write?

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