Wednesday, April 24, 2013

UNITED

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

I Pledge Allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, Indivisible for Liberty and Justice for All.

The original Pledge of Allegiance was written by Francis Bellamy. It was first given wide publicity through the official program of the National Public Schools Celebration of Columbus Day, which was printed in The Youth's Companion of September 8, 1892, and at the same time sent out in leaflet form to schools throughout the country. 

Be Proud Americans!

36 comments:

  1. Fitting post considering Boston!!!!!

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    1. Actually, that's what I was thinking of...

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  2. I hope my post doesn't ruffle feathers, that's not my intention. I'm all for the Pledge of Allegiance - it's a great want to "unite" us especially after a tragedy. But I'm also a history buff and I'm always fascinated by things that we always thought were one way and written by a certain person only to find out the opposite. History is great. So here it goes:

    Francis Bellamy (1855 - 1931), a Baptist minister, wrote the original Pledge in August 1892. He was a Christian Socialist. Francis Bellamy in his sermons and lectures and Edward Bellamy in his novels and articles described in detail how the middle class could create a planned economy with political, social and economic equality for all.
    His original Pledge read as follows: 'I pledge allegiance to my Flag and (to*) the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.' He considered placing the word, 'equality,' in his Pledge, but knew that the state superintendents of education on his committee were against equality for women and African Americans. [ * 'to' added in October, 1892. ]
    In 1954, Congress after a campaign by the Knights of Columbus, added the words, 'under God,' to the Pledge. The Pledge was now both a patriotic oath and a public prayer.
    Bellamy's granddaughter said he also would have resented this second change. He had been pressured into leaving his church in 1891 because of his socialist sermons. In his retirement in Florida, he stopped attending church because he disliked the racial bigotry he found there. Copyright 1992 by Dr. John W. Baer

    I was born in 1961 so I remember "under God' always being there, but my parents remember when it wasn't. Isn't that interesting?

    Again, I mean no disrespect to the oath, just my fascination with history taking over :)

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    1. Great history lesson, Debbie! Thanks for sharing. No feathers ruffled here.

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  3. It's amazing how Americans rally to their country and countrymen each time something terrible happens. This is a fitting post after the recent tragedy that happened in your country.

    Thanks for the visit and happy blogging the rest of the way to Z - we're nearly there!

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    1. I agree, why does always something bad have to happen for us to Unite?

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  4. love your posts! fun and well done!
    superman is awesome! and i <3 the new Q!
    read is right! and true treasure!
    as a sub, i encountered my first pledge punks in hs the other day who didnt want to stand and say it. spoiled brats!!

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    1. A teacher friend said the same, however, he made them stand with the rest of the class, but they didn't have to say the pledge...

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  5. Great post for U, especially after last week's tragedy in Boston.

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  6. I had no idea on any of the background regarding the pledge. Interesting stuff.

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  7. I remember standing up and reciting the pledge in class every day when I was in elementary school. I know that when I was in junior high or high school it was changed to a moment of silence.

    Thank you for sharing the Pledge of Allegiance with all of us today and taking many of us back to a better day and time.

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  8. God bless America and bring it peace. Great post.

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  9. Makes me think of the 1812 flag on display at the American History museum in DC. Gave me a big gulp inside to see our flag displayed so beautifully.

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  10. This is a really great post, considering what happened in Boston.

    www.modernworld4.blogspot.com

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  11. Amen! May not be in schools anymore, but at least that one part of the phrase is still on our money.

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  12. That's interesting because I thought it dated from 1776.

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  13. A very timely and interesting post! I loved the history added by the first commenter too! I followed you, I enjoy reading your posts.

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  14. Great post and, regardless of what some might try to claim, I think we are a nation 'under God'.

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  15. tis interesting this Cathrina and also the way Americans take it very seriously whereas Brits don't really have all that solemnity about their country. thx for the follow.

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  16. I remember having to say this in school when I moved to Houston from England. No one told me that because I was British, I didn't have to say it. Even though I haven't lived in the US for 30 years, I still remember the words.

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